Is it “a 2-hour break”, “2 hours break”, “2 hours’ break” or “a break of 2 hours”?

 

Let’s look at the following examples:

 

I am going to take a 2-hour break.

I am going to take 2 hours of break.

I am going to take 2 hours’ break.

I am going to take a break of 2 hours.

I am going to take a break which will last for 2 hours.

 

I am taking two weeks’ vacation.

I am taking two weeks of vacation.

I am taking a two-week vacation.

I am taking a vacation of two weeks.

 

I have a four-year teaching experience.

I have four years of teaching experience.

I have four years’ teaching experience.

I have a teaching experience of four years.

 

An apostrophe is used in time and money references, among others, in constructions such as one hour's respite, two weeks' holiday, a dollar's worth, five pounds' worth, one mile's drive from here. This is like an ordinary possessive use. For example, one hour's respite means a respite of one hour (exactly as the cat's whiskers means the whiskers of the cat).

 

DO NOT USE APOSTROPHES FOR ALL TIME EXPRESSIONS - ONLY WHEN THEY COULD REPLACE THE WORD OF 

 

See http://www.grammar-monster.com/lessons/apostrophes_in_time_(temporal)_expressions.htm

 

http://www.wordcourt.com/archives.php?show=2005-03-30

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apostrophe

 

So, when talking about the years of experience you have, you will need to write it as:

 

Students benefit from more than 15 years of teaching experience with local and international students in Australian colleges.

 

Or,

 

Students benefit from more than 15 years’ teaching experience with local and international students in Australian colleges.

 

Or,

 

Students benefit from the more-than-15-year teaching experience with local and international students in Australian colleges.

 

** 版權所有 - Elisa

 

elisaenglish 發表在 痞客邦 PIXNET 留言(0) 人氣()